The Ultimate Block Party's Blog

Archive for December 2010

Have you ever been stumped on a problem and later on you had the “aha!” moment when you are watching TV, playing around, or even taking a shower? What ignited that moment of insight?

According to an article in the  New York Times this week, new neuroscience research  shows positive mood may prep the mind for the “aha moment” when we are faced with a tough problem. How? The research suggests that a positive mood may increase attention, perhaps on a subconscious level, so that we can pick up  important details that are often overlooked. So before your next big project maybe you should watch a comedy show or tell a good joke!

Have you noticed that children are highly creative? Perhaps the positive mood  incurred from playful experiences may also promote creative problem solving. Evidence suggests that children who play generate more creative solutions on subsequent tasks compared to those who do not (Pepler & Ross, 1981; Smith & Dutton, 1979; for a review, see Hughes, 1999). Some theorists suggest that children and great innovators alike engage in “bricolage,” a playful attitude that allows them to openly tinker, explore, collaborate, make mistakes, and rebuild their way to discovery. It is this mindset, scholars suggest, that makes play a powerful informal learning experience, one that naturally engages processes of experimentation and imagination—and one that is necessary for  creative innovation in the ‘knowledge age’ (Brown, 2010; Papert, 1994).

 

Featured article:

Carey, B. (2010, December 7). Tracing the Spark of Creative Problem-Solving. New York Times.

Interested in learning more?

Brown, J. (2008, October). Tinkering as a mode of knowledge production in the digital age. Presentation at the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, Stanford, CA.

Hughes, F.P. (1999). Play, creativity, and problem-solving.

Papert, S. (1994). The children’s machine: rethinking school in the age of the computer. New York, NY: Basic Books.

Pepler, D.J. & Ross, H.S. (1981).  The effects of play on convergent and divergent problem solving. Child Development, 52, 1202-1210.

Smith P.K. & Dutton, S. (1979). Play and training in direct and innovative problem solving.  Child Development, 50, 830-836.

 

 

This blog was written by Dr. Kelly Fisher, Postdoctoral Fellow at Temple University.



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